Kickstand install

Kickstand installation


A word about kickstands:

If you visit Surly’s website, they have published an article where they warn against using a stock bolt and clamp securing method for the kickstand. The problem with an unsupported clamp is that following the initial tightening of the clamp, the kick stand works back and forth against the thin walls of the chain stay tubing. Overtime it compresses the tubing enough that the kickstand becomes loose. In actuality, the kickstand didn’t loosen, instead the chain stay tubes compressed slightly.

Here’s where the problem comes, the logical step is to tighten the clamp bolt some more. Unfortunately, this compresses the chain stay tubing again and the process repeats itself until the deformation of the chain stay tubing is too severe.

So, how do you mount a kickstand and not damage your chain stays? The answer is two part in my opinion. Place a block between the chain stays that only allows you to apply a correct amount of clamping pressure to the stays. Second, distribute the load of the kickstand to the bicycle frame evenly. If you read the forums you will find many people have successfully installed kickstands and had no issues of damage by following these ideas.

The following steps will guide you through how to fabricate and install a quality kickstand mount. You can purchase these materials and fabricate it yourself. Or if you want to purchase a material kit from me.

Material Kit cost $45 (click here for eBay ad)

 

Please note that each size Surly frame requires a slightly different size teflon block. That’s why I provide this as a material kit to adapt to your specific frame size.


Begin with the teflon nylon block. It already has a hole and is machined to the rough shape. Fit check the block and try to mark where it needs to be trimmed. It’s important to take your time and make this block fit well with very little slop when installed.

Make sure the little hole is on the bottom while fit checking. This hole will be used later to install an anti-rotation pin.

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Below I marked a centerline as a reference and then marked how much material I thought I needed to remove to make it fit.

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Next use a belt sander or sand paper on a flat surface to remove the material. Take your time and check fit multiple times as you remove the material. You may find one end start to fit before the other. Adjust accordingly and aim for a nice slop-free fit.

Don’t forget to round the corner of the block so it can slide all the way back to the cross member without interfering with the radius of the weld.

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Here’s the final fit.

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Ok, so here’s the part about adjusting the correct amount of squeeze. Most all chain stays that I have measured have been 1.060″ or so. We are going to sandwich (top and bottom) the chain stays with two aluminum plates that have 0.060″ hard rubber attached to them. That means 1.060″ for the stays and 2 x 0.060″ for the rubber, totals 1.180″ thick. Less the amount we want to squeeze (0.030″) gives us a teflon block thickness of 1.150″. That is the thickness of the teflon block that I supply. If you are making your own,use the 1.150″ dimension as your thickness.

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Next we are going to prepare the Pletscher kickstand to mate with our bottom aluminum plate. Use a file and remove the three ridges across the top of the kickstand housing.

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Next install the stainless steel threaded stud into the kickstand housing.

Slide the bottom aluminum plate (one without the bevelled edges) onto the stud.

Make a reference mark on the aluminum plate that is parallel to the aluminum plate edge. This reference mark will you align the kickstand to the plate in the next step when you drill the kickstand housing for the anti-rotation pin.

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While maintaining the parallel housing vs aluminum plate edge (from previous step) drill a 3/16″ diameter hole 1/4″ deep into to the kickstand housing. Use the aluminum bottom plate as a guide (kit plate already has hole in it) and be careful to drill only 1/4″ into the kickstand housing.

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Here’s how it should look.

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Test fit all the pieces together with the supplied pin. It should feel pretty solid.

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Now test fit into the frame from below.

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When you look from above, the kickstand should line up with the left chain stay within reason.

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Next, test fit the aluminum top plate provided. This plate may need some trimming. I’ll explain below.

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On this bike (700c size wheels) the rear derailleur cable conflicts with the top plate. Mark the conflict area for trimming.

Note: I did not notice this conflict when building the 26″ wheel version bike.

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Use a rat-tail file and provide a notch that eliminates the conflict with the cable. You may need to file a couple of times to get the right fit.

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Here’s the final trimmed top plate.

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Now’s a good time to move the front derailleur through all three positions and make sure nothing conflicts with the top plate or the bolt.

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So here’s the final pieces ready for disassembly and paint.

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Once the paint work is complete, install the rubber pieces to both the top and bottom aluminum plates as shown.

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Now we are ready for final assembly. Use the included stainless steel nut and washer.

Tighten the nut and observe when the assembly starts to clamp onto the chain stays. You’ll know because you won’t be able to wiggle the kickstand anymore.

Slowly continue to tighten (shouldn’t be much more tightening) and you’ll feel the top and bottom plate connect with the teflon block. At this point you won’t be able to tighten any more and the clamp should feel really rigid to the frame.

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Trimming the kickstand legs to proper length


Find a straight edge (I used a level) and secure it to the bottom of the wheels. This simulates the ground level.

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Use a level to confirm the frame is perfectly vertical (side to side). Note front/back doesn’t matter.

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Here’s a better pic showing the bike sitting perfectly vertical (not leaning side to side).

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Now place a straight edge crosswise over the beam that is under the wheels. Use a level to level the straight edge. The point where this straight edge touches the kickstand is where the kickstand would touch the ground if it were sitting level on the ground.

Use a marker and mark this location on both legs of the kickstand.

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I used a white marker so you can see the mark. I then dropped down 3/8″ from my mark and made another mark. This is where you want to cut the leg. We want the kickstand to hold the bicycle a little above level position.

Do this for both kickstand legs.

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Use a Dremel tool with a cut-off wheel and cut the kickstand leg. Make you cut level.

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Next use a file and remove the sharp edges on the leg ends.

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Test your new kickstand.

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Word of caution:

Be careful not to put excessive loads on the kickstand. I normally lift the rear of the bike (from the seat) and extend/ retract the kickstand. Avoid trying to extend the kickstand by pulling the bicycle backwards. Especially when the bicycle is fully loaded with touring equipment.

Other than that, enjoy!

Proceed to Bike Badge installation

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